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Knott House

Built in 1843, probably by free black builder George Proctor, the Knott House was first occupied by attorney Thomas Hagner and his wife Catherine Gamble. The house served as temporary Union Headquarters in 1865, where Brigadier General Edward McCook announced the Emancipation Proclamation. Physician Dr. George Betton made the location his home and office in the 1880s. Betton assisted in the early medical training of his carriage driver, William Gunn, who became Florida-s first African - American physician. In the early 20th century, three Florida Supreme Court judges lived in the house, acquired by William and Luella Knott in 1928. As the wife of a state treasurer, Luella hosted notable social functions, and as a poet, she wrote verses about the home and its furnishings, causing the site to be known as "The House That Rhymes." With the death of the Knott's son in 1985, the Historic Tallahassee Preservation Board became the beneficiary, and after extensive renovations, the Knott House Museum opened to the public in 1992. Its administration was transferred to the Museum of Florida History in 1997.

Learn more about the Knotts and see more images of the Knott House.

Group Tours are also available

HOURS:
Guided Tours on the Hour
Wednesday-Friday: 1:00, 2:00, & 3 p.m.
Saturday: 10:00, 11:00 a.m., Noon, 1:00, 2:00, & 3:00 p.m.

LOCATION:
301 E. Park Ave., Tallahassee
Tallahassee, FL 32301
(850) 922-2459