Introduction Training Florida Home Front Floridian Service Impact on Florida
Florida on the Eve of War
Pearl Harbor and its Impact
Military Training in Florida
Aviation
Land Warfare
Amphibious
WAAC Training at Daytona Beach
The German Submarine Threat
Civil Defense & Patrols
Rationing & Government Effort
Scrap, Gardens & Kids' Activities
War Bonds & Women's Roles
Homegrown Armor: The Alligator
National Guard & State Guard
United States Army
Navy & Marines
Coast Guard
Army Air Force
Women on Duty
African Americans
War Heroes
War's Impact on Florida
Citrus Goes to War
Industry and War Products
Tourism During the War Years
The War Ends
How WWII Changed the State

Florida on the Home Front
Previous - Florida on the Home Front Home Next - Homegrown Armor: The Alligator

War Bonds and Stamps:

To help finance the war, the federal government raised taxes, which included the implementation of payroll withholding tax deductions, and mounted a determined campaign to encourage the purchase of war bonds and war stamps. A series of War Bond Drives took place during the war, with government officials and Hollywood actors and entertainers urging even greater participation. Ultimately, Americans purchased some $135 billion in bonds ranging in value from $25.00 to $10,000. Florida, even with its relatively small population, still purchased more than $145 million in war bonds and stamps by 1943.

New Roles for Women on the Home Front:

World War II provided a catalyst for improved economic, social, and political conditions among American women. This prompted demands for even greater advances during the women's rights movement of the post-war years. Women joined the work force as never before in history, while others raised children and maintained households while waiting for their husbands to return from military service. They kept up the spirits of those serving far from home by sending letters and care packages.

Thousands of women and children traveled across the country between military bases as their husbands and fathers were transferred. They fought the battle on the home front, as rationing and shortages of foodstuffs and other products made life increasingly difficult.

Many women donated to wartime charities and volunteered in organizations to assist in the war effort. The Florida Federation of Woman's Clubs, for example, opened its facilities across the state for Red Cross work and USO events. Members also sponsored scrap drives, promoted the planting of Victory Gardens, gathered books to distribute among soldiers, and sold war bonds, including the very successful "Buy a Bomber" campaign that raised $3 million.

Florida Remembers WWII
Volunteer registration at the Civic Exhibition Center in St. Petersburg, 1942 -- (Florida State Archives)
 Volunteer registration at the Civic Exhibition Center in St. Petersburg, 1942
(Florida State Archives)
Previous - Florida on the Home Front Home Next - Homegrown Armor: The Alligator
Exhibit ©2003 Museum of Florida History Home E-mail for more info